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I found it to be challenging, informative, and very current. ISSA provides great communication and they are always there from start to finish.

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United States (800) 545-4772

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Welcome to Trainers Talking Truths!

This is an International Sports Sciences Association (ISSA) podcast dedicated to exploring the fitness industry and uncovering the whys and hows of personal training. To do that, we’ll talk directly to the industry experts and the certified trainers. 

We’ll dig into fitness programming, business tactics, nutrition, and more. You’ll even hear from current training clients who offer insight from the other side.

Yes! I Want To Share My Story!

Tap Into The Medical Fitness Market

Jenny Scott:

Hello world. Welcome back for another ISSA podcast, Trainers Talking Truths. I am Jenny Scott here with my co-host with the most, Dan “The Man” Duran. How you're doing, Dan?

Dan Duran:

I am great, Jenny. I'm upright and I'm not pushing dirt, so it's a good day.

Jenny Scott:

There you go. I'm ready to be a squirrel today, and if you don't know what that means, you need to listen to our other podcast.

Dan Duran:

I want it to be my spirit ... Jenny will assign you a spirit animal and I've asked it to be the squirrel, but I think she's going to hold down on me now.

Jenny Scott:

I think the squirrel is sacred. We might have to hold on to the squirrel.

Dan Duran:

All right.

Jenny Scott:

That's awesome. Lisa, our guest, I'm going to have her ask me later what the squirrel means and we'll break it down for you.

Jenny Scott:

But today we have an awesome episode. We have with us a really important lady who's done a lot of work. She founded a really awesome professional network that we want to share with you guys. But we have with us, Ms. Lisa Dougherty. Hello, Lisa.

Lisa Dougherty:

Hi, Jenny and Dan. It's great to be here. I love ISSA and thanks for giving me the opportunity to share my story.


How did you get your start in fitness?

Jenny Scott:

Absolutely, and what a story it is. How did you get your start in fitness, Lisa?

Lisa Dougherty:

Well, actually I changed careers in my 30s. I was in the securities industry, stocks and bonds, and my dad was battling his second cancer and I had the opportunity to go back to school and leave an industry I wasn't really excited about, very stressful. I always loved fitness, always played sports, and the University of California Irvine had a two year fitness instructor program.

Lisa Dougherty:

With my dad battling cancer and me being interested in helping people with health challenges and taking a program that was being taught at a teaching medical university, I just thought it was to just an awesome opportunity. Most trainers are studying online and I'm at a university immersed in medicine, teaching fitness. So it was a very unusual circumstance. I was the last graduating class. They discontinued the program and I wish some college would pick up a program like that, maybe you guys in the future, to do that.

Lisa Dougherty:

Anyways, when I graduated, I wanted to help cancer survivors. And so I started Whole Body Fitness. This was before there was an internet. I don't know how old you guys are, if you remember. 

Jenny Scott:

Old enough to remember, yep.

Dan Duran:

I remember.

Lisa Dougherty:

I was putting flyers on car windshields.

Dan Duran:

The good old days.

Lisa Dougherty:

Yeah, back in the good old days. And I started to take a lot of specialty education from a company called DSW Fitness. They're no longer in business, but they had Alzheimer's and exercise, diabetes and exercise, Parkinson's, fibromyalgia, and so forth. And I found that I was drawing a lot of people with chronic disease and medical conditions in the Orange County area. And back then it was called special populations.

Lisa Dougherty:

And I think today healthy people are the special populations, but I was drawing in all these people. I hired a few trainers to work under me because I couldn't even handle the business that I was getting. And the internet launched and I created a website, Whole Body Fitness. And back then SEO mattered. There was no WebMD or John Hopkins University. When you Googled arthritis and exercise, Whole Body Fitness came up number one in Google back in the day.

Jenny Scott:

Nice.

Lisa Dougherty:

So I was getting emails from over the United States asking, "Gosh, are there trainers or a facility like yours near me? My daughter has type one diabetes. We live in Washington, D.C. My mom's a cancer survivor. We live in Seattle, Washington. Do you know of anybody?" And back in the day and still today, it's not like our industry's so connected that I know Barbara in Washington D.C. And I know Barbara has a studio and does diabetes with kids. That just wasn't known.

Lisa Dougherty:

So I was fielding all these emails and requests and I saw that there was a need. These people were looking for fitness to better their health to slow the progression of, recover from cancer and they just weren't finding help. And so I said, "Well, we need a directory of us or something." And I actually went to IDEA and spoke with them because they have a directory called Fitness Connect. And Dan, I'm sure you're familiar with them, Jenny maybe. And I met with Peter Davis and I said, "Hey, can you update Fitness Connect to include chronic disease and medical conditions, people need help in the United States. And that was the only directory of any trainers back in the day.

Lisa Dougherty:

And sorry to say that they just weren't interested and updating it would be a lot of money to change all this, reach out to trainers. Plus there wasn't even a lot of trainers educated. So I'm a problem solver, always have been since I was a little girl. And I went back to where I went to school and they had a business school there and I knew one of the professors who taught an entrepreneurship class. And I said, "I want to start a database management company." I'm a full-time trainer with four trainers under me, so I wasn't doing this for the money by any means. And I said, "Can I meet with your students? I want to create a business plan to start the MedFit Network."

Lisa Dougherty:

And so it was very grassroots that I did this project. And so I met with the students and they were graded on their semester with me to create a business plan for me. So I had my business plan and okay, now what do I do? I don't know how to do computer science software. Went back to UCI. And I met with the computer science department and different students and my boyfriend's son just graduated with his MBA from UCI. And he was busy not doing anything with it. So he kind of took on the project and the students, and it took him two years to build the MedFit Network, because it was on their time. It was all volunteer. And when I started it, it was mostly I was thinking of fitness, personal trainers.

Lisa Dougherty:

But as I started talking to different colleagues that were massage therapists or chiropractors or dieticians, they said, "Well, their industries don't have any directories either. Why can't they be on the MedFit Network?" And I said, "Well, I already bought the name MedFit Network. So how do chiropractors, massage therapists, how do they fit in MedFit?" And they're like, "Well, fitness is a state of being and wellness. And you could be fit mentally, fit to teach, fit to be a mom. And all of our professions are Allied Healthcare and we all work together." So I had to keep going back to the students and say, "Okay, we're going to add chiropractors now. We're going to add dieticians. We're going to add this." I started talking with IHRSA. They said, "You should have clubs." So then I went back to the students. Now we have to have facilities. And I think they wanted to strangle me every time I wanted to add more to the project.

Lisa Dougherty:

So two years later I have a database management company, zero members, zero anything, that's how long it took. This is 2013 now. So I started to reach out to different companies, ISSA was one, NASM, Perform Better, Power Systems, you name it. And I said, "Hey, I'm starting the MedFit Network. I'll give you a free page of advertising. I don't have any traffic yet, but will you send an email out to all of your trainers that you educate or buy your fitness equipment or take your magazine? Let them know I'm starting as it's free." And if they would join and create a public profile, people are looking for help.

Lisa Dougherty:

So what I learned over a three year period was, everything being free wasn't going to be a long-term business model.

Jenny Scott:

Sure.

Lisa Dougherty:

And even though I grew the registry to about 30,000 professionals in three years, I found that there wasn't enough educated people to really serve on this network. And also, there was no continued in any of our industries. So even as a massage therapist, if you took an oncology massage class, there was no ConEd, no one was creating ConEd for anybody's industry, even if they learn by cancer or diabetes. So early 2016 I was featured in the Huffington Post for creating this project, Why You Should Know Me in Medical Fitness. That got me a lot of attention because I got in front of a million people with the Huffington Post.

Jenny Scott:

Nice.

Lisa Dougherty:

And I remember polar heart rate monitors reached out to me, congratulated me, sent me a free heart rate monitor. I said, "Wow, we'd like to advertise on MedFit Network. How much does that cost?"

Jenny Scott:

Yes.

Lisa Dougherty:

Like, "I don't know. Everything's free and I'm just trying to get-

Jenny Scott:

$1 million!

Lisa Dougherty:

Anyway, that was $5,000. I just pulled a number from the air and I gave them advertising all over the website and shop for heart rate monitors. And they were really happy about that.

Jenny Scott:

Nice.

Lisa Dougherty:

My dad was battling, I think he was on cancer number four now. And he kept saying, "One day you're going to be on 2020 or 60 Minutes with this registry." And I would say to my dad, "I don't want to be on TV. I'm really shy. I just saw that we needed this, no one was doing it. And so I did it. And about a week after my dad died in 2016, I got a letter from the White House, the Obama family. And I was acknowledged as a Champions of Change finalist that year for creating this project–

Jenny Scott:

Nice.

Lisa Dougherty:

... to make exercises medicine and help people with health challenges find fitness and wellness and so forth.

Jenny Scott:

Oh, cool.

Lisa Dougherty:

Yeah, so that was very bittersweet because it came a week after his passing and I wish it would have came a week earlier because I think that was just as good as being on TVZ, we're getting that. So I could pause for a moment or I could tell you what I went on to do after that.

Jenny Scott:

No, I definitely want to hear what you did after that. First of all, dad was definitely there. He probably had a hand in it, I'm just saying. But how resourceful of you, by the way, to use college students. That just blew my mind. I would never have thought to go and get free labor from people that need credits for something. So smart.

Dan Duran:

Bright minds. Bright minds. That's a great idea.

Jenny Scott:

Yeah.

Lisa Dougherty:

It's a career builder and they got to work together and be part of it. And you know, later on when I went to do conferences, I would do my annual event at UCI because all those people wanted to come and see what they did, what they worked on. And they feel so proud that they were part of starting this project and this movement. But so anyways, after I received the acknowledgement from the White House, again, a lot of attention and Mayo Clinic reached out to me. They have five campuses. And they said, "Wow, what a great idea. People travel to Mayo Clinic, they get treatment, they go back home, drop off patient care. If we could refer to people in the MedFit network, that's great."

Lisa Dougherty:

They asked me if my website was HIPAA secure. I told them that college students built them, I think Band-Aids are holding it together. Just kidding. No, it's not HIPAA secure. I wasn't thinking of doing that. And so United Healthcare reached out to me. Again, very interested that there was a directory of ... Sorry, dog luck.

Jenny Scott:

You're good. You're good. We can edit it out.

Lisa Dougherty:

Someone must have knocked at the door. So anyways, so what I learned again was there wasn't enough educated people, and those of us, including me, there was no continued education. So in 2017, midyear, I founded a separate project. Again, I'm a problem solver and I've been acting like a nonprofit for seven years or whatever.

Lisa Dougherty:

So I started the MedFit Education Foundation. So it is a not-for-profit education foundation. And what I tasked it with initially was a webinar. So I know everybody's doing webinars now with COVID, but four years ago I was doing weekly webinars on Alzheimer's, cancer, diabetes, genomics, gut health, CBD, whatever people were asking their health practitioners and personal trainers about. "Should I use CBD?" "I have no idea." "How much sleep should I get?" "I don't know." "I can't lose weight because of my gut microbiome. What do you know about that?" "I don't know."

Lisa Dougherty:

So I started our webinar series and actually Club Industry called me industry acclaimed webinar series four years ago because I was just pumping them out every week, they were free for anybody part of the network. So my goal was, regardless of whatever education they got on their own, my foundation would give them 50 hours of free education every year on all these topics so they could stay up minimally on stuff, you know?

Jenny Scott:

Yeah.

Lisa Dougherty:

I then decided I wanted to do conferences and I started the Medical Fitness Tour. ISSA was a sponsor.

Jenny Scott:

Yeah.

Lisa Dougherty:

Yep. You guys were the sponsors and I wanted to post them at universities throughout the United States because I think that led to a higher reputable environment for education.

Jenny Scott:

Absolutely.

Lisa Dougherty:

If a medical conference is at a university versus at the Sheraton in LA. And so I called it the Avengers of special populations coming to a theater near you. And so I did eight events in two years. And what was really cool about it is that we were drawing all kinds of practitioners and about 20% of our audience were doctors. And I thought that was really interesting because I was not marketing to doctors. I didn't have doctor email addresses. I didn't know. But when they heard that there was a medical fitness conference at a university in their city, it piqued their interest.

Jenny Scott:

Yeah.

Lisa Dougherty:

So, I chose the topics in the speakers to be able to speak to anybody, to speak to a doctor, a chiropractor, a dietician, a trainer, my mom. I mean, I wanted to go. And so it was really cool with these events. You're sitting at a round table with a internist, a chiropractor, massage therapist, a school teacher wanting to know if there's a future for her students and medical fitness, all at one table, learning about cancer or learning about diabetes. And everyone thought it was so interesting. They've never been to an event where all of these people gathered in one place to learn. And I didn't know that was going to happen. And so anyways, I'm still writing Whole Body Fitness, you guys with four trainers, fully booked, doing this project, doing the foundation, doing the webinars, doing the conferences.

Lisa Dougherty:

At the end of 2019 I said to my team, "You know what? I don't want to do any more conferences in 2020. I'm burned out. I need to just breathe for a year." And then COVID hit.

Jenny Scott:

Yeah, perfect timing.

Lisa Dougherty:

It was very fortuitous. I had no events scheduled and I decide, "Okay, so what am I going to do in 2020?" So one of the things that I thought was really important, I started Medfit Professional Magazine. You guys have been part of that, ISSA, and part of that. Thank you, Andrew Wyatt for helping me get MedFit professional magazine off the ground. I got 40,000 subscribers pretty quick. I mean, there was no, no one producing any education in this space. Yeah, it wasn't any, it was just me. So what I decided to focus on last year, and this year was education and I wanted to recreate all those courses I took 17 years ago from a company that's no longer in business, and Alzheimer's diabetes, cancer, Parkinson's, MS.

Lisa Dougherty:

So in 2020, I went around trying to secure people in the fitness industry to author these courses. And I interviewed a lot of people for each topic. Some had that condition, like Christine Conti, she authored the arthritis course. She has rheumatoid arthritis. David Lyons has multiple sclerosis. He authored that course. Rick Richey has diabetes. He's authoring the diabetes course.

Lisa Dougherty:

So I tried to find fitness professionals that maybe had the condition or a parent or something, so that they had a connection to the course. I didn't want to just-

Jenny Scott:

Sure.

Lisa Dougherty:

... an empty education online PowerPoint course. I wanted it to have feelings. So we're launching 30 medical fitness courses. We'll partner with you guys and you're promoting them as well. I think we have about 10 of the 30 that are done.

Jenny Scott:

Nice.

Lisa Dougherty:

These courses were really important to me because they were being made during the pandemic to take into consideration the new norm of fitness, like outdoor programming, virtual training, telehealth. All these authors, since they're creating these courses during the pandemic are looking at what the new future of fitness is and talking about programming all these environments. So they're really unique. Again, I think everything happens for a reason and this project everything's just flow with reasons. So these courses were made during the pandemic.

Lisa Dougherty:

Also, what I thought was really ... Two more things important is that they interview the people with these conditions. I want learner, if you're going to learn about Parkinson's, I want you to meet people who have Parkinson's. I want you to hear, how did they feel when they got diagnosed? What are they doing to battle it, to stay? We interview caregivers, spouses, people with these conditions, their healthcare team.

Lisa Dougherty:

Again, I'll have to stick with Parkinson's. The gal interviewed a speech pathologist because they have speech issues, an therapist, a neurologist, because if you're a trainer and you're going to work with someone with Parkinson's and they say, they're going to their speech pathology or occupational therapist, I want the trainer to know what those people do, how they fit as part of the healthcare team in there. So throughout the course you're meeting all these different people. So it's very engaging as far as interviews and immersive.

Lisa Dougherty:

And I didn't want it to be a bunch of PowerPoints. Back when I did, I just read a book and took an exam and I just, I didn't want that. And then also with all these courses there's a business component, because I'm sure we all know, I hate to say it, "The average trainer lasts about two years."

Jenny Scott:

Yep, truth.

Lisa Dougherty:

They don't succeed in business. They don't know how to run a business. I was very fortunate because I found a niche that was really serving. To this day, there's still, this is the blue ocean, it really is. There's a strong business component and all these, how do you market to these people? Where do you go? What do you say online? How do you write to them? How do you meet them? How do you communicate with them? Because they're looking for your help. There's not many people helping people with Parkinson's for example. So I mean, you're going to stand out in your community as a hero doing something like that.

Lisa Dougherty:

So we're doing courses, we're partnering with you guys on that. So that's, I can tell you about the future of MedFit, but I'm going to stop right there. And so that's the network and that's the foundation. And we invite trainers at ISSA that have done any coursework, like your genomics, your health coach, you have a therapy one. They should be joining a network, getting a public profile page. We want people to find you, people are always coming here. Increase your education in this space so that you can expand your scope of services and programs that you offer and really make a difference in your community. Past this pandemic we're still facing chronic disease, obesity, opioid, absolutely. And health crisis. That's that's our future. I mean, that's-

Jenny Scott:

Dan and I are always telling people, you have to continue your education. And my favorite part, I think, Lisa, about what you're doing is that it's education not just for fitness professionals, but it's for everybody. Because that's what's needed. We need to educate the public. But like you said, there's not enough people out there doing it. And I love that you did webinars for your education in the beginning, and you still do. Because like, for example, my mom, she's 74 years old. Don't tell her I told you that. But she goes to the local hospital right around the corner from her house, once every three weeks, I think it is. And they do community sessions for this, where they talk to people about diabetes. They talk to people about their diagnoses from when they were in the hospital or seeing a physician at the hospital, they refer them to these community classes.

Jenny Scott:

And my mom used to be a teacher, so she's phenomenal at it. But she sits in a classroom them with these people and teaches them like, "Here's how you take care of yourself. Here's the things that you should know about your condition. Here's how it's going to affect you potentially."

Jenny Scott:

But it's such a small little universe because it's just the people that go to that specific hospital-

Lisa Dougherty:

Exactly.

Jenny Scott:

Or that get referred to it, and a webinar would reach so many more people. So if people out there are interested and they're taking this kind of education, you mentioned Mayo Clinic, I live in Phoenix. There's one up in North Scottsdale, north Phoenix. And of course, a lot of these hospitals, there's so many hospitals in every major city. I'm sure if you walked in and talked to them and said, "Hey, I want to teach courses here about this condition, this condition, this condition." They'd probably be like, "Yes, please." Right? Talk about making your own niche.

Lisa Dougherty:

Yeah, yeah, yeah. Or if you said, Hey, I do continuum of care. When your patient leaves the hospital, trust me, they don't want them to come back. They want to keep them out of the hospital. So that education, or if they could refer to a trainer that they know knows about osteoporosis, arthritis, cancer, diabetes, Parkinson's, or whatever. They're going to love to refer to that trainer, they don't want them back in the hospital.

Jenny Scott:

Yeah, absolutely. Yeah, their end goal is to help that person become better and not have to come back for care. 100%. And it is a bummer that no other universities or colleges that you know of offer coursework on this, because this is not something that you can just Google and learn about. There's so much more nuance to it. So your courses I'm sure are super comprehensive and give people more information. The deeper stuff, like you said, who do they see when they have these conditions? How do their caretakers or their spouses or their significant others, their kids, how does it affect the people around them?

Lisa Dougherty:

Exactly.

Jenny Scott:

There's so much more to it.

Lisa Dougherty:

Yeah. We're actually talking with different universities because to this day they're still teaching college kids how to work with generally healthy people.

Jenny Scott:

Yeah. And what is, like you said, healthy is the minority now. Absolutely.

Lisa Dougherty:

It's a population. It is.


What advice would you have for people who want to do more for their business?

Dan Duran:

This has been, it's just a fascinating journey and kudos to Lisa for all the work you've done and all the people you've helped. You mentioned something where you said it's a blue ocean out there. So for the listeners out there, and the ISSA trainers who are sharpening their saw, they're adding, like you said, genomics classes, exercise, therapy classes, et cetera, to kind of specialize. What kind of advice would you have to them being that you did exactly this and that is you stepped out of the traditional one-on-one personal training model and built a business in a very unique space. What advice would you have for those folks that think that that might be a good fit for them?

Lisa Dougherty:

Well, definitely education is probably the most important thing that I gave myself and I invested and it was an investment to do that education courses. But to me, I'm a business person. And so to me it was, it made ... I took things that helped me grow my business. So anything that's going to translate into business, I think a lot of trainers look for cheap CECs or what's a personal interest in them, and you know what, that's not going to help them grow their business.

Lisa Dougherty:

And when you're someone that became really good at what they did, which was me, medical fitness years ago, my book got filled and I had to keep overflowing to other trainers. Like I said, I had four trainers under me to where I could step back and all four of them were working and I'm doing all that community outreach to the hospital, to senior care centers or communities, drug and alcohol recovery. We've serviced those.

Lisa Dougherty:

People that check into those may, hate to say it, have money. They're checking into the Golden Hills Retreat recovery program. And if you're going in there and educating them about fitness and wellness and creating a bond with them while they're in there, I had contracts with different drug and alcohol recovery centers. When they check out, they want to work with you and their team. You've already built trust with them when they were in a vulnerable place in their life. So, I mean, I hate to say it, but that's a great market to service. I think drug and alcohol is up 60%.

Jenny Scott:

Oh, I can imagine.

Lisa Dougherty:

And so we actually have a drug and alcohol recovery fitness specialist course, and that's a great niche. If you could service and go in and educate people when they're in there, whether it's talks to the group or group fitness or one-on-one training, and those people are going to check out and be loyal customers to your business.

Jenny Scott:

And I think you're making a really great point though. Don't feel bad about saying like you're targeting people that have the money to pay for your services. The education that you've done costs money, your time costs money, right? So we are worth something as trainers. And a lot of people make the mistake as you talk about being a good business person. That's why a lot of people don't succeed, because they're like, "Oh, I feel bad. I'm only going to charge $20 an hour." Can you live on $20 an hour? Lisa lives in California. No, you can't live on $20 an hour. It's like she's on the beach right now. You’d live in a cardboard box. You know what, you have to be realistic.

Lisa Dougherty:

So when I looked in my avatar, my avatar had to make at least $75,000 a year, okay. And they had to have arthritis, joint replacement, cancer, whatever. So, that was my niche. Their age didn't matter, but their income mattered, because they're a core payment to somebody. I'm six, nine, depending on how many times a week, I'm six, $900 a month, I’m a car payment to somebody. So I look for people, and if you want to work 40 hours a week as a trainer, which I mean, I work 40 plus hours back in the day. That's a lot of time on your feet. And people train twice a week, you need 20 people. 20 people that make 75,000.

Lisa Dougherty:

So when I first became a trainer, day one, I put on the wall 20, an eight and a half by 11 paper, 20. And when I got my first client, tore off 19, and so forth. And when I took that one off, I got my book full. So that was my focus is I need 20, I need 19. And you just, and there's three million people in Orange County. I just need 20 people.

Jenny Scott:

Oh, that's the best way to think about it, right? How many people are in your area? Even in a three block radius of you?

Lisa Dougherty:

I guess it was 20. If you're going to work twice a week, which is probably acceptable, that's all you need. To me as a business person, putting 20 on the wall, that seemed like an easy goal, 20.

Jenny Scott:

Absolutely.

Lisa Dougherty:

I needed.

Jenny Scott:

Yeah, and then people out there who look at something like that and they're like, "Oh, I still feel bad." But if you think about it, I have clients that pay me a $1,000 a month as well. But if it's worth that to them to live a little bit longer and live healthier and have longevity, but enjoy their life and be pain free, live with their condition, whatever it may be. It's worth that to a lot of people. And if they could find somebody to literally give me your, like I'm giving you money, like help me. There's people, like you said, the people that are reaching out to you, they're literally throwing money at people. Like, "Help me."

Lisa Dougherty:

I had to keep hiring trainers and because all they needed was 20, and that next person, all they needed was 20. And pretty soon all of us together, that's 100 people. That's still 100 out of three million people in Orange County. Our books were full. But if you focus on that and that's your goal and you stay clear, "This is my target. This is what I want. This is what they need to make." That's how I book my book. And within three years I was making $150,000 a year, a long time ago. So in today's work, I don't know what that would be. But as I just stayed focused, that was my goal.

Jenny Scott:

Absolutely, I love this, Lisa, because this is two birds with one stone. And I feel like so many people out there need to hear it. You have such a passion for helping people with chronic health conditions and these people, like you said, they are the majority now, they need help. But in the end you're also taking care of yourself, right? You guys can't see her. She's in phenomenal shape, beautiful lady. You obviously take care of yourself, right? So it's not like you've gone to the wayside just to help other people. But you're taking care of your needs as well while you're helping other people. It can be done. In successful professionals that last more than those average two years do just that, you have to.

Lisa Dougherty:

And for 23 years, I train three times a week. I run five miles every day. I get eight hours of sleep every night. I run a foundation, I run a network, and I'm a personal trainer, and I'm not under any stress. I work hard and I surround myself with good people that empower me and we empower each other. And that really, that's the secret sauce.

Jenny Scott:

Absolutely. Ugh, round of applause for you, Lisa. You are speaking my language right now. Literally, if I could shake every new trainer out there by the shoulders and be like, "Listen," this is exactly what they need to hear. Because so many people are just like you, started off where you were working 40 plus out hours a week. I did it too. In the gyms you're working 50, 60 hours a week and you never sleep. You're exhausted all the time. Two years of that was enough for me. And I was like, "How can I work less, make more and help more people?" So you find a way to do that.

Lisa Dougherty:

I did that, yep. Yep.

Jenny Scott:

That's awesome. So cool.


How can people learn more and connect with you?

Dan Duran:

Lisa, this has been fascinating, and I think it's important that our listeners be able to learn more about your foundation, your program. How to learn from you, how to sharpen their saws. So can you share with our listeners the best ways to connect with you, to connect with your business, to learn from you?

Jenny Scott:

Yeah. How can we get on the MedFit Network?

Lisa Dougherty:

So medfitnetwork.org is the website. And you'll see it's for professionals and consumers. So because we get a lot of consumer traffic looking for you, the trainer. So there's a join page, join now. And so we want you to join, be part of this. I mean, I wanted to be part of something and there was nothing in this space for me to be a part of. So MedFit Network. MedFit Classroom is where we're producing the webinars and they're free if you're part of this network. So you're going to get free education being part of the network as well. I mean, I want you to stay up to date on stuff and that's where the courses are. And I know you guys have a page on your website about MedFit Classroom and MedFit Network as well. You can reach me at lisa@medfitnetwork.org and I'm always happy to give any advice that I can give or perspective. And I'm going to tell you like I see it, so know that.

Jenny Scott:

Awesome. Very cool. Great opportunity guys. Make sure you guys connect with her, get on that network. Start growing your business, right?

Lisa Dougherty:

Yeah, absolutely. We know there's 300 million people, $86 trillion are spent on healthcare and so forth. And we can make a difference in our industry. I mean, if every trainer joined this space, there's still not enough of us to solve our healthcare problems. So please get this education, get on this network. This is the blue ocean for you. This is the future of fitness.

Jenny Scott:

Absolutely. Where do you see MedFit going in the future?

Lisa Dougherty:

Well, I would like to see medically necessary exercise prescriptions for trainers.

Jenny Scott:

Yeah, exercise is medicine.

Lisa Dougherty:

Yep. So I'm going to be launching MedFit Care probably in 2022 where I have a couple sports medicine doctors that will be writing medically necessary exercise prescriptions. That means that people part of the MedFit Network, their clients can get a prescription. They could use HSA, FSA dollars to pay for personal training.

Jenny Scott:

Oh that's clutch.

Lisa Dougherty:

It has to be a medically necessary exercise prescription, can't be to lose weight. And then also too, they'll be able to write personal training off on their income taxes under a medical expense.

Jenny Scott:

Oh, that's going to be so clutch for a lot of people.

Dan Duran:

That's huge.

Lisa Dougherty:

Yep.

Dan Duran:

Huge. Great job.

Lisa Dougherty:

That's where this project's going to go next is MedFit Care.

Jenny Scott:

Nice. So that's if like, so my neighbor needed exercise. I could send them to this network MedFit Care and they could get the prescription that they need to be able to get this through insurance?

Lisa Dougherty:

Not insurance. It's not going to be insurance.

Jenny Scott:

Oh, not insurance, just HSA?

Lisa Dougherty:

Not insurance. Yeah, right now insurance, in order for insurance we'd have to become a licensed industry like chiropractors and dieticians I don't see us being that. 

Jenny Scott:

Ah, gotcha.

Lisa Dougherty:

I don't see us being licensed in my lifetime. I'm not going to do that battle. But what we can do is they can use HSA and FSA dollars if it's a medically necessary exercise prescription. And they could write it off under medical expenses if it's medically necessary and 7.5% of their adjusted gross income. And to your point, who's affording us as people that make 75,000 a year plus, and I'm $10,000 a year. And if they could write $10,000 off on their income taxes, because of the training, because they have a medically necessary exercise prescription. My clients are going to like that.

Jenny Scott:

Yep, absolutely. That's perfect. It works out perfectly.

Dan Duran:

And for the listeners out there, HSA is a health savings account.

Lisa Dougherty:

Yes.

Dan Duran:

Which is something that anybody can open, regardless of the insurance policy or plan you have or don't have, but it's something you can open. It's a great way to divert some money, save on some taxes. And then as you can see, in the near future here be able to pay for and write off exercise prescriptions.

Lisa Dougherty:

Yep. I'm a problem solver, that's the next problem I'm going to solve.

Jenny Scott:

Right. I know, you've done a great job. You've definitely made it deadly, so this is awesome.

Lisa Dougherty:

Well, thank you, Jenny and Dan for letting me share my story with ISSA pros and I would love to see more of them as part of this network in this space, medical fitness. This is the future, it's now.

Jenny Scott:

Absolutely.

Lisa Dougherty:

Not even the future, it's now.

Dan Duran:

More than ever.

Jenny Scott:

Absolutely. Yeah, we're going to have to talk coming up here, maybe about some workshop opportunities and stuff. Because I know people are itching to get back into live events and stuff too. So yeah, let's see what we can figure out.

Lisa Dougherty:

Yeah.

Jenny Scott:

Very cool. Well, thank you so much for joining us, Lisa.

Lisa Dougherty:

Well, thank you guys and I wish you a wonderful afternoon, and again, thanks for having me.

Jenny Scott:

Absolutely. Dan, any last words for our listeners today?

Dan Duran:

Specialize, specialize. If you're paying attention the last 30 minutes, think outside the box. On your niche, do something special and you'll help more people.

Jenny Scott:

Yeah, absolutely. Yep. Expand. Keep learning guys. That's all you got to do. So with that, guys, we bid you a due and as always, we remind you to make good choices. We will be talking to you soon.